SEER Lab encourages undergraduate student research and undergrads play a vital role in project success

 

  

SEER Lab faculty and students are part of the larger Medical Geography program in the department. In SEER Lab, students engage in fundamental and applied geospatial science and spatial epidemiology or disease ecology projects. These skills are complementary to our ever growing list of undergraduate courses in medical geography, quantitative methods, GIS, remote sensing, sustainability and development, and regions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT UNDERGRADS (Spring 2016)

Alexandra Campione (2016 Undergraduate Scholars Program Awardee)
Major: Biology with Minor in Geography
Year in degree program: Sophomore
Plans for the future: Medical Degree with research in emerging infectious diseases
Research interests in SEER LAB: deer behavior and transmission dynamics of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus in semi-captive deer in Florida
Hannah Cutright
Major: Biology
Year in degree program: Senior
Plans for the future: Veterinary School to pursue a DVM
Research interests in SEER LAB: deer behavior and transmission dynamics of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus in semi-captive deer in Florida
Max Morris
Major: Geography – Environmental Geoscience Specialization
Year in degree program: 3rd year, IA
Plans for the future: Plans to pursue a graduate degree in Geography
Research interests in SEER LAB: space-time patterns of wildlife diseases with an emphasis on host/vector relationships between deer and Culicoides insects in Florida.

 

 

FORMER SEER UNDERGRADS (2010 – 2014) 

Allison Schlack – Allison completed an undergrad thesis in the lab and works on the DTRA project focused on spatial patterns of anthrax and FMD.

Luke Smith – Luke was an undergrad prevet student working with Ian Kracalik on modeling of anthrax in Georgia.

Lindsay Bell – Lindsay worked with Jason Blackburn on the spatial patterns and ecological niche modeling of Bacillus anthracis in Kyrgyzstan for a CRDF Global project.

Ulrica Diamond – Ulrica was funded by NIH/MIDAS Project to work on the spatio-temporal patterns of epidemic cholera in Haiti.